Citizenship (Naturalization)

Citizenship (Naturalization)

Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is conferred upon a foreign citizen or national after he or she fulfills the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The general requirements for administrative naturalization include: (1) a period of continuous residence and physical presence in the United States; (2) residence in a particular USCIS District prior to filing; (3) an ability to read, write, and speak English; (4) a knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and government; (5) good moral character; (6) attachment to the principles of the U.S. Constitution; and, (7) favorable disposition toward the United States.
All naturalization applicants must demonstrate good moral character, attachment, and favorable disposition. The other naturalization requirements may be modified or waived for certain applicants, such as spouses of U.S. citizens.

You may be able to apply for naturalization if you are at least 18 years of age and have been a permanent resident of the United States for at least 5 years; or for at least 3 years during which time you have been, and continue to be, married to and living with your US citizen spouse; or while currently serving honorably in the US military, with at least 1 year of service, and you apply for citizenship while in the military, or within 6 months of discharge.